Vírus mortal que sangra nos olhos que mata até um terço dos pacientes chega à Espanha

A DEADLY virus that kills 30 per cent of those it infects by making them bleed from the eyes has reached Spain after a man was hospitalised last week.

The man in the city of Leon, in Spain’s North West, was diagnosed with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) after being bitten by a tick.

Symptoms of CCHF include bleeding from the eyes and fever

Symptoms of CCHF include bleeding from the eyes and feverCrédito: Getty
The virus is usually carried by ticks and passed to humans through bites

The virus is usually carried by ticks and passed to humans through bitesCrédito: Getty

The unnamed patient was hospitalised last week in Leon before being airlifted to another hospital by the Ministry of Defence on Thursday.

Spanish authorities said that heremains in a stable condition, despite the clinical severity that this pathology implies.

According to the WHO, the mortality rate for CCHF is 30 por cento.

Symptoms include fever, aches, tontura, mood swings, confusion and bleeding, particularly of the eyes and on the skin.

Sign of infection often present suddenly and many of those who die of the virus do so within two weeks of diagnosis.

It was first discovered in Crimea in 1944 and is endemic in Africa, Ásia, the Middle East and the Balkans.

READ MORE WORLD NEWS

Moment naked psychiatric patient smashes moving ambulance window & legs it

SMASH AND DASH

Moment naked psychiatric patient smashes moving ambulance window & legs it

Cases are rare in Northern Europe with only 3 cases in Spain since 2011.

Em março, uma British woman was diagnosed with CCHF, the UK’s fourth case since 2012.

She was treated at the Royal Free in London.

No momento, Dr Susan Hopkins, the UK Health Security Agency’s chief medical advisor. said that the virusdoes not spread easily between people and the overall risk to the public is very low.

Mais lido no The Sun

Inside crumbling town where dealers turn derelict homes into ‘drug stores’

‘OUT OF HAND

Inside crumbling town where dealers turn derelict homes into ‘drug stores’

The virus is usually carried by ticks and livestock and passed to humans through bites.

It can be transmitted between people through infected blood or bodily fluid.