Telecamere spia nascoste trovate nei bagni Ikea – e sono stati lì per 6 ANNI

IKEA has removed cameras staff found ‘hidden’ in toilets.

The CCTV was found behind ceiling panels in both the mens’ and womens’ loos at its distribution centre, in Peterborough, Cambs.

And when staff confronted bosses at the furniture giant they admitted the lenses had been there since 2015.

Shocked staff uncovered the hidden cameras at Ikea's Peterborough distribution centre

Shocked staff uncovered the hidden cameras at Ikea’s Peterborough distribution centreCredito: Google Maps

A member of staff reported noticing an infra-red light through a gap in the panels when the lights were switched off. A number of cameras were then uncovered by staff.

Staff claim the cameras were allegedly installed in 2015 to help Ikea combat rumoured drug-taking among some staff.

Footage has been retrieved from hard-drives and handed to third party investigators at the Swedish firm’s distribution centre in Peterborough, Cambs.

If Ikea is found to have invaded staff privacy they willhand themselves over to the authorities”, staff were told.

Staff were so outraged by the discovery some members quit their jobs.

Ex-employee Shannon Bodily was one of 600 stunned by the discovery

Ex-employee Shannon Bodily was one of 600 stunned by the discoveryCredito: BBC

Ex-employee Shannon Bodily, who left the company in July, said she felt “violato” by their presence.

The former staff member said: “I feel vulnerable, I feel violated

Lei ha aggiunto: “If I find out I’m on that footage I feel it will affect me an awful lot. It’s already affected me.

I would like them [Ikea] to be prosecuted.

They can’t get away with thisit’s not fair and it’s an invasion of your privacy in the workplace.

Another female employee of three years was so shocked that she immediately quit her job.

La mamma, chi ha 20 anni, ha detto al The Sun: “I had worked there happily but I am so knocked by what has happened that I can’t step foot in there again.

This goes against Ikea promoting itself as a caring employee. Now Ikea’s guilty of a terrible breach of personal privacy.

It is claimed the furniture giant added the cameras to 'spy' on drug-taking

It is claimed the furniture giant added the cameras to ‘spyon drug-taking

“The thought of being secretly filmed while going about your personal business is sickening.

I couldn’t continue there knowing I had to face bosses who may have been watching footage of me using the toilet.

Everyone I know who works there is disgusted and outraged.”

Another source told The Sun: “Everyone is in shock.

“Staff have been offered counselling. A number of Muslim women were in tears.

“No-one can believe this has been going on.

“We were told in emotional briefings that they were trying to clamp down on any cheating in drug testing of the workforce.

“But what on earth was the firm thinking. It is a scandal.”

Workers were last night (Tues) said to be considering taking legal action.

Nel mese di giugno, a court ordered Ikea to pay a fine of £860,000 after being found guilty of spying on staff in France.

Ikea France was accused of using private detectives and police officers to collect staff’s private data.

This included illegally accessing their criminal records in order to vet applicants for jobs.

The Ingka groupwhich owns most of Ikea’s stores around the worldapologised and condemned the practices.

According to data protection laws, CCTV cameras should only be used in ‘exceptional circumstances’ in areas where you would normally expect privacy, such as in changing rooms or toilets.

An Ikea Spokesperson said:  “We take the protection of our co-workers’ safety and privacy very seriously.

"Nel 2015, for the purpose of maintaining a safe workplace for all co-workers, surveillance cameras were installed in the void above the ceilings in the bathrooms and locker areas, and in the corridors outside of these rooms at the Peterborough Distribution Centre.

“Investigations into this issue are ongoing and we are working hard to remove the cameras as a matter of priority.

“We understand the discovery of these cameras may be concerning, and during this time we are offering support to co-workers on-site.”

Independent data watchdog, the Information Commissioner’s Office, said it had not received any complaints about the issue.