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Raising people’s spirits is such a great feeling, says Kelvin Fletcher

AS a farmer and dad of four, Kelvin Fletcher is used to feeding lots of hungry mouths.

So the ex-Emmerdale actor and his actress wife Liz Marsland knew the drill when they joined our Helping Hands at Christmas campaign by pitching in at a lunch club run by Royal Voluntary Service.

Kelvin Fletcher and his actress wife Liz Marsland joined our Helping Hands at Christmas campaign by pitching in at a lunch club run by Royal Voluntary Service

Kelvin Fletcher and his actress wife Liz Marsland joined our Helping Hands at Christmas campaign by pitching in at a lunch club run by Royal Voluntary ServiceKrediet: Paul Tonge
For our Helping Hands at Christmas campaign we are asking YOU to support Royal Voluntary Service’s life-changing work with time and/or money

For our Helping Hands at Christmas campaign we are asking YOU to support Royal Voluntary Service’s life-changing work with time and/or money

Kelvin, 38, said of the meeting: “It is an integral part of the diners’ week, and to spend time meeting new people has been fantastic.

The volunteers get just as much from it as the people who come here to eat.”

For our Kersfees veldtog, we are asking YOU to support Royal Voluntary Service’s life-changing work with time and/or money — however little of each you can spare at this tough time.

See below for how you can help.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Donate time

THERE is a wide range of volunteering jobs available, including making a companionship call, serving hot meals at our lunch clubs to someone who would not otherwise eat, delivering practical help to those recovering from illness and working on hospital wards or at vaccination sites.

If there is not a suitable role in your local area, you might want to sign up as an Emergency Response Volunteer.

You will be contacted when new vital roles are introduced, to support communities and the NHS over winter.

Visit the website: royalvoluntaryservice.org.uk/helpinghands
to find out about jobs in your area and follow the instructions on how to sign up.

Donate money

IF you can’t volunteer you can donate money to help cover the costs of recruiting and training volunteers.

Just £6 a month covers the cost of a volunteer for a year.

To donate, visit the website above or text HANDS to 70507 to give £5*

*You will be charged £5, plus one message at your standard network rate.

Royal Voluntary Service will receive 100 persent.

If you wish to discuss this mobile payment, bel 020 3282 7863. Registered charity number 1015988 (Engeland en Wallis) & SC038924 (Skotland).

By texting HANDS to 70507 you are agreeing to us contacting you by SMS about fundraising and to tell you more about our work.

To give £5 without receiving further contact by SMS, text HANDSNO to 70507.

Kelvin, farmer Andy Sugden on ITV’s Emmerdale van 1996 aan 2016, also farms in real life in Cheshire and in 2019 won Kom streng dans with pro Oti Mabuse.

He was a huge hit at the club, not least because he and former Cold Feet actress Liz showed up with a Cointreau pie.

The weekly club, in Alderley Edge, Cheshire, which has been run since 1964 from the Methodist Church, is led by coordinator Anne Bale, 67, with her team Celia Reed, 64, Kari Charles, 63, and Julie Dickson, 63.

They are supported by volunteer drivers Tim Kynaston, 53, and Jenny Hulme, 75, who provide lifts for diners with mobility issues.

They cater for up to 20 regulars, ranging in age from mid-seventies to 96. Many live alone.

het Liz gesê: “At times like we are going through we need to come together. If you can give a bit of time, it can make a massive difference to an elderly person.

The more you can help, the better.”

Kelvin added: “The gratification you get from knowing you’ve helped out and raised someone’s spirits is great.”

Nou, more than ever, clubs like this are a lifeline for the elderly and vulnerable as they struggle to heat their homes and afford essentials including food.

For diner Jean Astle, 87, the lunch group became a vital part of her life after her husband had to go into a care home.

Sy het gese: “It was nice to know I had a routine. I get out of the house and have a bit of company. I’ve made nice friends.”

During Kelvin and Liz’s visit, ex-volunteer Carolyn Poole came in to play piano so everyone could sing Christmas carols.

Retired solicitor Julie Dickson, 63, explained why she helps at the club.

Sy het gese: “My mother suffered from loneliness, so being here means I can stop others feeling that way.

Some of our team only give up a few hours once a month. It’s really doable.”

The club used to run on Thursdays as well as the usual Tuesday but lately has lacked helpers to do that.

Kelvin added about volunteering: “You do get something out of it yourself as well. It’s a great feeling and only a couple of hours.”

During Kelvin and Liz’s visit, ex-volunteer Carolyn Poole came in to play piano so everyone could sing Christmas carols

During Kelvin and Liz’s visit, ex-volunteer Carolyn Poole came in to play piano so everyone could sing Christmas carolsKrediet: Paul Tonge