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Antieke standbeeldvrou wat 'n skootrekenaar gebruik is 'bewys van tydreis', teorie aansprake

THIS ancient Greek tombstone has conspiracy nuts in a flapas they reckon it shows a woman using a laptop with USB ports.

A bonkers theory claims it is proof a time traveller took a portable computer back to when the marble relief was sculpted in 100BC.

Grave Naiskos Of An Enthroned Woman With An Attendant dates from around 100BC

Grave Naiskos Of An Enthroned Woman With An Attendant dates from around 100BCKrediet: Getty
The mystery folding box with holes in the side has conspiracy fans in a flap

The mystery folding box with holes in the side has conspiracy fans in a flapKrediet: Getty

Die 37 inch statue, called Grave Naiskos Of An Enthroned Woman With An Attendant, is on display at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, Kalifornië.

It was used as a funeral marker and depicts a woman sitting on an armchair as a slave girl holds open a thin folding box.

The mistress touches the lid and gazes at the upper sectionwhich some online believe is the screen of a laptop.

Along the side are two holes said to resemble USB ports or other cable inputs.

The base is too shallow to be a jewellery box, according to a video on conspiracistsYouTube channel Still Speaking Out.

“It depicts an astonishing object that bears a striking resemblance to a modern laptop or some handheld device,” the video claims.

“When I look at the sculpture I can’t help but think about the Oracle of Delphi, which was supposed to allow the priests to connect with the gods to retrieve advanced information.”

The explanation is more down to earth, sê kenners.

A historian’s gallery description of the sculpture says it shows the woman whose grave it marked looking into ashallow chest”.

It was a common theme in funerary art at the time, expressing the hope loved-ones would enjoy the same earthly pleasures in the afterlife.

The object could also be a pair of wax tablets, which were used for writing, archaeologist Kristina Killgrove wrote in Forbes.

She adds the holes in the side could have held wooden objects which have since rotted away.

It’s not the first time gallery visitors claim to have found evidence of time travel in artworks.

Art fans were baffled at a vrou “holding an iPhone in a painting from the 1860s.

Another man was spotted thumbing what looks like an iPhone in a 1930s mural of a scene from 17th century New England.

And Apple boss Tim Cook joked he had found one of his firm’s gadgets in a 350-year-old masterpiece in Amsterdam.

Meanwhile sports fans reckoned a time traveller was videoing ringside with an iPhone during a Mike Tyson fight in 1995.

And what looks like a flip-phone was spotted in a photo of the celebrating Brazil captain na die 1962 World Cup final.

A woman appears to be holding an iPhone in The Expected One, by Ferdinand George Waldmüller

A woman appears to be holding an iPhone in The Expected One, by Ferdinand George WaldmüllerKrediet: WIKIMEDIA
Some viewers reckon this native American from the 17th century is scrolling a phone screen in a 1937 mural by Umberto Romano

Some viewers reckon this native American from the 17th century is scrolling a phone screen in a 1937 mural by Umberto RomanoKrediet: US Postal Service
Apple boss Tim Cook claimed he spotted an iPhone in this 350-year-old painting

Apple boss Tim Cook claimed he spotted an iPhone in this 350-year-old paintingKrediet: Getty