Victoria Cross of general who charged enemy with broken sword sells for £223k

THE Victoria Cross won by a brave Scots general who charged the enemy with just the butt of his sword sold for £223,000.

General James Blair was left grasping just the blunt hilt of his weapon after the blade snapped during a skirmish in the Indian Mutiny of 1857.

The Victoria Cross won by General James Blair sold for £223,000

The Victoria Cross won by General James Blair sold for £223,000Crédito: BNPS

Despite having a serious sword wound to his arm, he fearlessly led his men in a charge at the mutineers to engage in fierce hand-to-hand combat.

Marcus Budgen, of auctioneers Spink & Filho, disse: “General Blair was one of the finest characters to emerge from the Indian Mutiny.”

It is hard not to be blown away by the gallantry he displayed when outnumbered and outgunned.

We were thrilled with the strong price achieved and the buyer was ecstatic to add this to his collection.

Gen Blair’s Victoria Cross citation, describing what happened next, estados: “After breaking the end of his sword on one of their heads, and receiving a severe sword cut on his right arm, he rejoined his troop.

In this wounded condition, and with no other weapon than the hilt of his broken sword, he put himself at the head of his men, charged the rebels most effectually, and dispersed them.

Gen Blair was born in Neemuch, Índia, no 1828 and joined the 2nd Bombay Light Infantry no 1844.

He spent his final years in Melrose, no Scottish Borders, and died in 1905.

The Victoria Cross awarded to General James Blair

The Victoria Cross awarded to General James BlairCrédito: BNPS
The medal set awarded to General Blair including his Victoria Cross, Centro

The medal set awarded to General Blair including his Victoria Cross, CentroCrédito: BNPS

Military dog who charged through enemy gunfire to save the lives of British soldiers fighting al-Qaeda in Afghanistan awarded the animal equivalent of the Victoria Cross